Skip to main content
Uncategorized

Bug Spray

By November 12, 2020No Comments

☀️Summer ?- bug spray

So excited to do a joint post with Dr.Chen from @plateful.health .
.
The repellent you choose needs to take into consideration where you live/are going, and what diseases/insects are endemic.
.
.
As rates of insect-borne illnesses rise, some debilitating like Lyme, it’s important to consider efficacy as well as safety/toxicity when selecting a bug spray. .
.
The top 5 active ingredients in bug spray recommended by EWG and EPA registered (meaning it’s efficacy and safety has been assessed by the EPA):
.
?DEET (<10-30%)
? Picaridin – (<20%) found by EWG to be as effective as DEET, without the neurotoxicity concerns.
? IR3535 – (<20%) can be irritating to eyes but poses few other safety risks.
? Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus – (<30-40%) Shorter protection time than DEET
? 2-Undecannone .
.
1️⃣ DEET has had a bad name because animal studies have shown possible neurotoxicity. However, large human studies have not been conclusive. EWG concluded in 2018 that DEET is generally safe when used as directed. The concentration matters. .
.
2️⃣Concentrations indicates HOW LONG the repellent lasts for, not how effective it works. Concentrations higher than 50% have not been shown to be more effective. CDC recommends using concentrations <10% in no known disease risk area. And <30% in a known disease risk area. In children, discuss the ideal concentration with your doctor if you are in a high risk area. .
.
6️⃣ Bug spray should not be used on babies 2 months or younger, AAP cautioned against DEET >30% in children of any age. And oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children younger than 3 years. .
.
7️⃣Botanical repellents are unregulated and of variable efficacy. They are ok if the risk of bug-borne disease is low, however, in high-risk areas, more reliable repellents should be used. .
.
8️⃣Avoid repellants that have parabens, phthalates, or synthetic fragrance

Leave a Reply